Forestry Products

Below you will find white papers on topics involving process control and automation.
Submitted by Jon Monsen
on Fri, 07/21/2017

In this paper I will show how an analysis using Metso’s Nelprof® control valve sizing and selection software’s unique ability to graph the installed gain of a control valve can be helpful in selecting the optimum pump for a balance of good controllability and minimum energy use.

Submitted by Des-Case
on Mon, 07/06/2015

In recent years, portable filtration units, often referred to as filter carts, have become a common tool in the lubrication professional’s arsenal. Increasing demand for these systems has led to the development of a wide range of new products and driven down prices, which is a good thing. When filter carts first came onto the scene they were primarily used by service providers for decontaminating large systems. These early models were typically designed for low viscosity oils in large volume systems and were on the expensive side, making them unsuitable or impractical for many applications.

Submitted by Fit-LINE
on Thu, 06/18/2015

Operational efficiency is a critical factor in the fluid processing industry. The synergy of fitting components and assembly technology to achieve this objective is the focus of Fit-LINE, Inc. Applying extensive polymer technology and injection molding expertise, the company has analyzed the design, tooling and manufacturing processes required to create high-performance solutions for demanding high-purity fluid processing applications. Through extensive R&D, testing and evaluation, Fit-LINE has isolated three variables that need to be addressed to ensure leak-free fitting assemblies.

Submitted by Jon Monsen
on Thu, 04/11/2013

I was recently asked how the pressure at the vena contracta of a control valve in a liquid application can be determined. I am sharing my answer below.

Submitted by Jon Monsen, Ph.D.
on Mon, 01/21/2013

For most systems, in order to get good control with stability throughout the full range of required flow rates, we need to use a control valve that has an installed flow characteristic that is linear, or at least as close to linear as possible.

Submitted by Jon Monsen, Ph.D., Valin Corporation
on Mon, 07/25/2011

There are two strategies for reducing control valve noise:

1. Source control, that is doing something to the valve to make it less noisy, and

2. Path control, that is doing something to prevent the noise from reaching the people who would be bothered by it.

Submitted by Jon Monsen, Ph.D.
on Fri, 07/22/2011

We will briefly discuss what causes aerodynamic noise and some of the things that can be done to reduce aerodynamic noise generated by control valves.